Agile Testing Days 2013 - experience report

Better late than never :-)

I attended Agile Testing Days 2013 and went to India for holidays. I am back in UK now and it’s time to reflect on the conference and share my experience.

Agile Testing Days started with a great note - some of us went for dinner and many people stayed in the bar till morning. I was relaxed because I didn’t sign up for any tutorial for the next day. I decided to take a day off from testing and explored Berlin before joining others for dinner.

Opening keynote of the conference was from Andrea Tomasini. I found it extremely fast paced and packed with.. well a lot of information on what agile is. You can find my notes from the session here . Key takeaway from the session for me were the notion of social, technical and business risk in agile projects and reasons of dysfunction ...

How to maximise the benefits of attending software testing conferences?

Someone has rightly said - conferences are what you make of them. It is possible to hear completely different accounts of what people experienced at the same conference. It could be great learning experience for some and complete waste of time for others.

Going to a conference is a huge commitment in terms of time, cost and efforts. I am an independent consultant so do not have to give a business case or take permission - but still I do need to justify this investment of time and money to myself.

My main objective to go to the conferences is - to learn more. I learn by attending sessions and I learn by talking to people between the sessions. It’s always nice to share problems, solutions, constraints to understand what works in a given context and why. It’s also nice to challenge (with the intention to learn more or clarify) and ...

Best of TestingGeek - Blog posts I like about software testing

For quite some time I was thinking of improving blogs / articles I have written on TestingGeek in past. Many articles I have written in past do not reflect my current thinking. However I decided to leave that exercise. May be it's better to show that my thinking ( and writing) has changed. I might re-write some of the articles and link them from the old articles to ensure that folks landing on my old pages have opportunity to see what I am thinking now.

However, this thought process was useful because I ended up thinking about the opposite - which blog posts do I like?

So here is the list of blog posts (In no particular order) I like on TestingGeek. You may have read some of them earlier, if not it would be nice to know your thoughts on them.

Testers journey from Manual to Political

This post was story ...

Swiss Testing Days - Experience report

Last week I went to Zurich to present at Swiss Testing Days. I started my day by attending keynote - The nine forgettings - from Lee Copeland. I had attended his keynote in the past as well and he is an excellent presenter and story teller. Have a look at the slides he used and video recording . It was the same topic but it's definitely worth the time.

I agree with pretty much all the points mentioned by Lee, except certifications and boundaries.

Lee mentioned that certification is a way to grow professionally and it shows that you are serious about the profession. Well, I am not a big fan of certifications - certifications do not show that person holding certification is serious about the job. It shows that person holding certifications has passed an exam - nothing more than that. However, Lee mentioned certification as part of “Forgetting to grow” and he ...