Software Testing Rhyme - Keep Pushing

On Friday, I went to Brighton for the TestBash. If you have never been to TestBash before, make it a point to attend this conference next year. It's a great event.

This event was in Brighton and I was banking on my train ride from Clapham Junction to Brighton to prepare 99 seconds talk. Not sure whether it was the rhythm of train or my excessive exposure to children's rhymes (I have a three year old boy :-)) - I converted my software testing experience in a rhyme. Hope you find it amusing :-)

Keep Pushing

From the corner in an office, where I was sitting alone

I looked at the defects and thought, how do they born!

I started writing code, To find those tricky defects

That made devs confused, testers were scared.

It took us some time, to realise we are a team

Testing is the goal, automation is ...

Top 6 challenges of a tester working in agile team

I recently published this article on linked-in and thought it will be a good idea to re-publish it here as well - hope you like it.

Software testing is challenging and working as a tester in agile team can often be very challenging. I have been working with agile teams for a while now. In my experience, irrespective of the maturity and size of the team, as a tester, I have always faced following challenges

1. Sprint becomes mini waterfall

In many teams, sprint often becomes mini waterfall. It does not matter whether sprint is a one week, two week or three week sprint - sprint can always become mini waterfall. In my early days as agile tester, I used to wait for the stories to come my way and somehow all the stories would become available towards the end of the sprint. I struggled with it and tried to solve it ...

Software Testing Career - Are you moving in the right direction?

So this image triggered some discussion on twitter and I think it's worth explaining it a bit more.

With this image, I wanted to highlight two main things

  1. Shortage of skilled / inspiring testers
  2. Need to move up and become skilled and inspiring tester.

There is no scientific basis for this image. This image is purely based on what I have observed or experienced. I have met people who would be a perfect fit for the categories I have created. Also, this pyramid has nothing to do with the experience - It's possible to spend entire lifetime as a lazy tester and newbies can be truly inspiring. Also, it's not a progression as such - skilled testers doesn't mean that they'll have to be community builders, domain experts or decent coders. I have used pyramid to show only one thing - size of the pool.

I have seen fewer ...

Selenium London Meetup on 26'Th Feb

Some of you might already know that David Burns has given me responsibility of running London Selenium Meetup group.

I am happy to announce that first Meetup for this year is scheduled now.

Please have a look at our meetup page and RSVP if you would like to join this meetup / event.

Also, feel free to get in touch if you would like to speak in this or in any future selenium meetup in London.

Thanks.

TestSpicer Update - What's already done and what's coming next?

I just sent an update to folks who have registered at TestSpicer.com and thought I will re-post that email as blog as well to discuss it with you all :-)

At TestSpicer, we have progressed steadily over the past few months and have added many features.

Over the past few months, we have added many interesting APIs. You can use APIs to generate many interesting things such as strings, unicode, valid credit card numbers, dates, images and so on. We have also started adding APIs for basic checking. For example, If you want to check broken links on a page, you can call API to get list of broken links on the page.

Consider this - If you are using page object model, you can use this api in your constructor so that every time you construct a page object, you also check presence of broken link on that page. That ...

Goals for 2014

This is the first time I am publishing my goals for next year public. This will probably put some pressure on me and might give some ideas to you as well.. So here is my list

Things I need to learn to remain a relevant technical tester

  • Functional programming languages and NoSQL / Non-relational databases
  • Tools available for testing native and hybrid Chrome and iOS apps
  • Ops tools such as Kibana, Splunk and deployment tools such as puppet
  • Mocking frameworks & tools which give insight on automation coverage.

Things I need to do to contribute meaningfully in the software testing community

  • Make London Selenium Meetup Group more effective and organise quarterly meetups
  • Active participation in discussions on twitter, blogsphere and software testing club
  • Start writing reviews of the books I have read / reading
  • Submit articles for StickyMinds, Testing Planet, Testing Circus and TeaTime With Testers
  • Share automation code and examples with the ...

Agile Testing Days 2013 - experience report

Better late than never :-)

I attended Agile Testing Days 2013 and went to India for holidays. I am back in UK now and it’s time to reflect on the conference and share my experience.

Agile Testing Days started with a great note - some of us went for dinner and many people stayed in the bar till morning. I was relaxed because I didn’t sign up for any tutorial for the next day. I decided to take a day off from testing and explored Berlin before joining others for dinner.

Opening keynote of the conference was from Andrea Tomasini. I found it extremely fast paced and packed with.. well a lot of information on what agile is. You can find my notes from the session here . Key takeaway from the session for me were the notion of social, technical and business risk in agile projects and reasons of dysfunction ...

How to maximise the benefits of attending software testing conferences?

Someone has rightly said - conferences are what you make of them. It is possible to hear completely different accounts of what people experienced at the same conference. It could be great learning experience for some and complete waste of time for others.

Going to a conference is a huge commitment in terms of time, cost and efforts. I am an independent consultant so do not have to give a business case or take permission - but still I do need to justify this investment of time and money to myself.

My main objective to go to the conferences is - to learn more. I learn by attending sessions and I learn by talking to people between the sessions. It’s always nice to share problems, solutions, constraints to understand what works in a given context and why. It’s also nice to challenge (with the intention to learn more or clarify) and ...